Ocnutrition’s Blog


Peanut Butter Banana Granola Wrap
September 26, 2012, 4:15 am
Filed under: Recipes

Peanut Butter and Bananas in a clear glass bowlA quick and healthy snack that provides you with protein, whole grains and fruit to keep you fueled for your busy day.

Ingredients

  • 1 whole wheat tortilla
  • 1-2 Tbsp peanut butter
  • 1 banana
  • 1/3 cup granola
  • ½ Tbsp honey (optional)

Preparation: 5 minutes

  1. Spread peanut butter on whole wheat tortilla.
  2. Place banana on tortilla.
  3. Sprinkle granola over banana.
  4. Drizzle with honey, if desired.
  5. Roll into a wrap.

 Makes 1 wrap

 *This recipe was adapted from www.allrecipes.com

This information was brought to you by OC Nutrition, Your Trusted Source for Health & Nutrition Advice, and Marchell Bailey, CSULB Dietetic Intern. OC Nutrition offers nutrition counseling services over the phone or in person in Newport Beach, Irvine, Orange, Anaheim Hills, Chino Hills and Long Beach. If you have any questions or would like to schedule an appointment, please contact:

Kristy L. Richardson, MS, MPH, RD, CSSD, CHES
Registered Dietitian & Exercise Physiologist
kristy@ocnutrition.com
http://www.ocnutrition.com
(949) 933-6788



Vegetarian Diets: Is it Healthy to Cut Meat out of Your Diet?
June 5, 2012, 5:42 pm
Filed under: General Nutrition

Vegetarian diets have become increasingly popular over the past few years as more and more studies have shown positive health benefits to following a mostly plant based diet. But some of you are probably wondering, is consuming a vegetarian diet really healthy for you like everyone says?

 What exactly is a vegetarian?

 A vegetarian is one who doesn’t include meat, poultry, seafood, or any products containing these foods in their diet.

  • A lacto-ovo-vegetarian is one who includes eggs and dairy products in their diet.
  • A lacto-vegetarian is one who includes dairy products but excludes eggs from their diet.
  • On the more extreme side, a vegan is one who only eats plant products and doesn’t include any animal products in their diet.

 Is this type of diet healthy for your body?

Yes, it can be! According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, “appropriately planned vegetarian diets, including total vegetarian or vegan diets, are healthful, nutritionally adequate and may provide health benefits in the prevention and treatment of certain diseases.” They also state that well-planned vegetarian diets are appropriate for people of all ages, including those who are pregnant or lactating, children, adolescents, and athletes.

So what does an “appropriately planned” vegetarian/vegan diet mean? Following a vegetarian diet can be tricky if you’re not aware of certain nutrients that you may become deficient in, especially if you’re following a vegan diet. Here are the nutrients you want to make sure you’re getting enough of:

  • Protein: Since most protein is found in meat and dairy products, if you’re eliminating these from your diet it may be hard getting enough protein. Here are some great non-meat, non-dairy sources of protein: quinoa, legumes such as beans, peas and lentils, and soy products such as tofu and soy milk. You can also try meat substitutes and protein supplements.
  • Vitamin B12: Lacto-ovo-vegetarians can get adequate amounts of vitamin B12 in their diet from a combination of eggs, dairy foods, fortified foods, and supplements, if consumed regularly. For vegans, it is a little trickier. Sources of B12 for vegans will mainly have to come from regular use of vitamin B12 fortified foods, such as fortified soy and rice beverages, some breakfast cereals and meat substitutes. Most of the time, vegans will need to take a vitamin B12 supplement.
  • Calcium and Vitamin D:These are mainly a concern for those who eliminate dairy products from their diet.
    • Some non-dairy sources of calcium are: soy beans, tempeh, broccoli, leafy greens such as kale, okra, turnip greens, collard greens, and bok choy, blackstrap molasses, and calcium fortified cereal, orange juice, and soy and rice beverages.
    • Great non-dairy sources of vitamin D are: fortified tofu or tofu products, fortified soy milk or soy products, fortified cereals, fortified orange juice, and mushrooms.
    • Did you know the sun is a great source of vitamin D too? Researchers suggest that 5-30 minutes of sun exposure (without sunscreen) to the face, extremities or back, between 10am-3pm at least twice a week, can usually lead to sufficient vitamin D synthesis. For individuals with limited sun exposure, a vitamin D supplement may be needed.
    • Iron: The iron in plant foods is called nonheme iron. Nonheme iron is not as well absorbed as the iron found in meat, which is why the recommended iron intake is 1.8 times higher for vegetarians. Some great iron sources for vegetarians can be found in: beans, lentils, quinoa, tofu, tempeh, and leafy greens such as spinach, Swiss chard and turnip greens.

Research has shown that those who follow a vegetarian diet usually have higher intakes of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, soy products, and fiber and lower intakes of saturated fat and cholesterol. Because of the higher intake of dietary fiber and nutrients such as antioxidants, magnesium, potassium, folate, carotenoids and other phytochemicals, vegetarian diets are often associated with many health benefits, such as improved cholesterol and blood pressure levels and a lower risk of hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and cancer. With all of these great benefits, it’s no wonder the number of vegetarians in the U.S. is expected to increase within the next decade! But following a vegetarian diet isn’t for everyone. If you still love your meat but would like to try and include more fruits, vegetables and whole grains into your diet, try choosing one day out of the week to have a vegetarian meal! You might be surprised at how delicious it tastes and how great you feel after eating it.

This information was brought to you by OC Nutrition, Your Trusted Source for Health & Nutrition Advice, and Megan Ting, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo Dietetic Intern. OC Nutrition offers nutrition counseling services over the phone or in person in Newport Beach, Irvine, Orange, Anaheim Hills, Chino Hills and Long Beach. If you have any questions or would like to schedule an appointment, please contact:

Kristy L. Richardson, MS, MPH, RD, CSSD, CHES
Registered Dietitian & Exercise Physiologist
kristy@ocnutrition.com
http://www.ocnutrition.com
(949) 933-6788



Middle Eastern Chickpea Sliders
June 5, 2012, 4:48 pm
Filed under: Recipes

High in protein and fiber and full of healthy fats, this delicious meatless option is a great way to change it up from the usual hamburger this summer!

Ingredients:

1 (8oz.) red, purple, or yellow potato
3 T olive or canola oil, divided
1 tsp minced garlic
1 (15.5 oz. can) chickpeas (garbanzo beans), rinsed, drained, and divided
1 T chopped fresh parsley
½ tsp salt
½ tsp grated lemon rind
½ tsp smoked paprika
¼ tsp freshly ground black pepper
2 large egg whites, lightly beaten

Preparation: 45-55 minutes

1. Place potato in saucepan, cover with water. Bring to a boil, cook for 20 minutes or until very tender. Drain and cool slightly.
2. Coarsely chop and place in a medium bowl.
3. Add 1 T oil and garlic to bowl. Mash potato mixture with a potato masher until slightly chunky.
4. Remove 3 T chickpeas and place in a small bowl.
5. Add remaining chickpeas to potato mixture, mash until well blended.
6. Stir in remaining 3 T whole chickpeas, parsley, and remaining ingredients.
7. With moistened hands, divide mixture into 6 equal portions (about 1/3 C mixture per portion), shaping into a 3-inch patty.
8. Heat 1 T oil in a large nonstick skillet, over medium high heat. Or, if you don’t have a nonstick skillet, try spraying a regular skillet with nonstick cooking spray.
9. Add 3 patties to the pan and reduce heat to medium. Cook 4 minutes or until bottoms are golden.
10. Carefully turn patties over. Cook 3 minutes or until bottoms are golden and patties are set. Repeat procedure with remaining 1 T oil and 3 patties.
11. Serve on a whole wheat slider bun with your choice of toppings! Some suggestions for toppings are: spinach or mixed greens, crisp radish slices, tomatoes, roasted bell peppers, pickles, avocado, your favorite cheese, red onion, caramelized onions, sauteed mushrooms, pesto, BBQ sauce, guacamole, or tzatziki sauce. Be creative, have fun, and enjoy!!

Makes 3 servings (2 sliders per serving)

*This recipe was adapted from www.cookinglight.com

This information was brought to you by OC Nutrition, Your Trusted Source for Health & Nutrition Advice. OC Nutrition offers nutrition counseling services over the phone or in person in Newport Beach, Irvine, Orange, Anaheim Hills, Chino Hills and Long Beach. If you have any questions or would like to schedule an appointment, please contact:

Kristy L. Richardson, MS, MPH, RD, CSSD, CHES
Registered Dietitian & Exercise Physiologist
kristy@ocnutrition.com
http://www.ocnutrition.com
(949) 933-6788



Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet
May 31, 2012, 11:56 pm
Filed under: General Nutrition

ImageCeliac Disease is gaining popularity in news and health coverage as more people are being diagnosed. Celiac Disease is a digestive disorder caused by the inability to tolerate gluten.  Gluten is the plant-protein found in wheat, barley, rye and triticale.  When someone with Celiac Disease ingests gluten, it damages the tiny projections of the small intestine (villi) that are used to absorb nutrients.  If untreated, severe damage can occur to the small intestine causing nutrition and immune-related disorders that are potentially life-threatening.  

As a result, people with Celiac Disease must avoid gluten-containing grains and make healthy substitutions.  It is also recommended that people with Celiac Disease avoid oats, as they tend to be processed with wheat products.

Thankfully, almost all grocery stores carry forms of gluten-free flours and restaurants are developing gluten-free menus.  Living with this disease is no longer the inconvenience it once was, and in fact can create a diet with more variety.  Some common gluten-free flours include: buckwheat, corn flour, corn meal, rice flour, millet, and quinoa.  Safe grains and other starches include rice (brown, wild, red, short and long grain, jasmine, and basmati), risotto, popcorn, corn, potatoes, lentils, beans, and peas. 

Some symptoms of Celiac Disease include bloating and abdominal pain, diarrhea and/or constipation, unexplained weight loss or weight gain, weakness, fatigue, and bone or joint pain.  A blood test can screen for your risk of Celiac Disease, but cannot confirm it.  An intestinal biopsy is the most conclusive way to diagnose the disease.  Once diagnosed with Celiac Disease, it is time to start a life-long gluten-free diet.  After effectively removing gluten from the diet, the small intestine will begin to heal and in most cases without the use of medications.  

This information was brought to you by OC Nutrition, Your Trusted Source for Health & Nutrition Advice, and Lyndsay Romano, CSULB Dietetic Intern. OC Nutrition offers nutrition counseling services over the phone or in person in Newport Beach, Irvine, Orange, Anaheim Hills, Chino Hills and Long Beach. If you have any questions or would like to schedule an appointment, please contact:

Kristy L. Richardson, MS, MPH, RD, CSSD, CHES
Registered Dietitian & Exercise Physiologist
kristy@ocnutrition.com
http://www.ocnutrition.com
(949) 933-6788

 



Get Your Plate In Shape; Fill Half-Your-Plate With Fruits & Veggies
April 13, 2012, 10:49 pm
Filed under: Diabetes, General Nutrition, Heart Health, Weight Management

Did you know the average American eats only 43% of the recommended amount of fruit and 57% of the recommended amount of vegetables each day?  Include more colorful fruits and vegetables in your menu plan for a brighter future.  Fruits and vegetables reduce your risk of heart disease, cancer, and other chronic conditions.

When choosing fruits and vegetables, “eat the rainbow of colors.”  Different color groups provide a unique set of vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients.  Fruits and veggies are nutritious in any form:  fresh, frozen, canned or dried.  They are available year round and are ready when you are.

Benefits of eating more Fruits and Vegetables:

  • Fiber help fill you up, lowers cholesterol, and aids your digestive system
  • Disease Reduction including heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, some cancers and Type 2 Diabetes
  • Vitamins & Minerals  are abundant which keeps you stay healthy and energized
  • Low in Calories and rich in flavor and texture

How to include more Fruits & Vegetables

  • Include veggies with breakfast:  add mushrooms and peppers to eggs to make an omelet, or wrap up an egg and veggie scramble in a whole wheat tortilla
  • Enjoy fruit and veggies as your snack:  top of Greek yogurt with frozen fruit, dip carrots or sliced bell peppers in hummus, or make up a trail mix of dried fruit and nuts
  • Add extra veggies to your favorite dishes: pile veggies on top of your pizza, stuff them in your sandwich, or add veggies to pasta sauces, soups, and casseroles
  • Include a colorful salad with your lunch or dinner and add some fresh or dried fruit for a little sweetness
  • Choose fruits and veggies that are darker or brighter in color; these contain more vitamins and minerals
  • Each week choose a new fruit and/or veggie.  There are hundreds to choose from and it adds variety to your meal
  • Purchase fruits and veggies from local farmers or markets to ensure the freshness and hence its nutrient content

This information was brought to you by Robyn Moss, MS, RD and OC Nutrition, Your Trusted Source for Health & Nutrition Advice.  OC Nutrition offers nutrition counseling services over the phone or in person in Newport Beach, Irvine, Orange, Anaheim Hills, Chino Hills and Long Beach.  If you have any questions or would like to schedule an appointment, please contact:

Kristy L. Richardson, MS,MPH, RD, CSSD, CHES
Registered Dietitian & Exercise Physiologist
kristy@ocnutrition.com
http://www.ocnutrition.com
(949) 933-6788



FREE Mindful Eating Seminar with Robyn Moss, MS, RD from OC Nutrition
April 13, 2012, 10:30 pm
Filed under: Dietitians, Eating out, General Nutrition, Weight Management

Brain ImageTuesday, May 1, 2012
6:30-7:30 pm

Just For The Health Of It and OC Nutrition are bringing you a nutrition seminar to make you think.  There are countless acts of mindless eating that we all do throughout the day ~ eating on the go, driving through for coffee in the morning, afternoon fatigue leading to poor snack choices,  eating in front of the TV, etc. These speedy habits may contribute to a range of eating and digestive issues.  Learn how to enhance your ability to eat with greater awareness assisting in better food choices and how to stop eating when you are full.

Sign-ups are required.
Call or email to register today…

JUST FOR THE HEALTH OF IT!
417 N. Tustin St., Orange   ~  714.639.0494
email: diane@justforthehealthofit.info
 
This information was brought to you by Just for the Health of It and OC Nutrition, Your Trusted Source for Health & Nutrition Advice. OC Nutrition offers nutrition counseling services over the phone or in person in Newport Beach, Irvine, Orange, Anaheim Hills, Chino Hills and Long Beach. If you have any questions or would like to schedule an appointment, please contact:

Kristy L. Richardson, MS, MPH, RD, CSSD, CHES
Registered Dietitian & Exercise Physiologist
kristy@ocnutrition.com
http://www.ocnutrition.com
(949) 933-6788



Test your Diabetes Nutrition Knowledge
April 10, 2012, 3:00 am
Filed under: Diabetes

1. Which of the following macronutrients increases blood sugar levels?

a. Protein
b. Carbohydrate
c. Fat

2. Which of the following foods will raise your blood sugar?

a. Cookies
b. Beans
c. Strawberries
d. All of the above

3. Which of the following is NOT a way to help with diabetes meal planning?

a. Eliminating all carbohydrates from your diet
b. Counting carbohydrates
c. Plate method

4. Hemoglobin A1c is a snap shot of your blood glucose at one moment in time?

a. Yes
b. No

5. Foods with sugar in them are not allowed in a diabetic diet.

a. True
b. False

6. Eating vegetables and whole grains can help control blood sugar.

a. Yes
b. No

7. Doing physical activity and losing weight has no impact on diabetes.

a. True
b. False

8. If I count my carbohydrates, then I can eat as many carbohydrate free foods as I want.

a. Yes
b. No

Answers

1. Which of the following macronutrients increases blood sugar levels:

b. Carbohydrate

There are three types of carbohydrates in food. Foods high in sugar, starch, and dietary fiber are carbohydrates. Foods high sugar and starch will raise blood glucose levels (dietary starch does not increase glucose levels) because it is from carbohydrates that glucose is formed. Foods with a high concentration of sugar (such as fruit juice, candy, cake) will increase blood glucose more quickly than carbohydrate foods with a lower concentration of sugar.

2. Which of the following foods will raise your blood sugar?

d. All of the above

All foods with sugar and starch will form glucose and raise your blood sugar. The main categories of carbohydrate foods that will raise your blood sugar include: grains, starchy vegetables (beans, potatoes, sweet potatoes, green peas, corn, and squash), fruits, and dairy.  Cookies, and fruit are high sugar carbohydrates, and beans are a high starch carbohydrate. These foods will all increase blood sugar so it is important make healthy carbohydrate choices. Choose carbohydrate foods that also contain dietary fiber to help control blood sugar levels. Making healthier carbohydrate choices (whole fruits and vegetables, and whole grains) will help control blood sugar better as well as decrease risk of other diabetes-related diseases such as heart disease and stroke.

3. Which of the following is NOT a way to help with diabetes meal planning?

a. Eliminating all carbohydrates from your diet

Fruits, starchy vegetables, dairy and whole grains are carbohydrate foods that are important foods in the diet. These foods are high in fiber, and have lots of vitamins and minerals. Eliminating all of these foods from the diet can put the diet at risk of being deficient in vitamins and minerals.

Counting carbohydrates is a useful tool for meal planning. All of the carbohydrate foods are divided into 15g amounts (Ex. 1 slice of bread, 1/3 cup of rice, ½ cup of oatmeal, ½ cup of potato, ½ cup of beans, 1 small piece of fruit, 1 cup of milk) to represent 1 serving of carbohydrate. At breakfast, lunch and dinner you should strive for 3-4 servings of carbohydrate, with 1 serving of carbohydrate for snacks. Keeping carbohydrates consistent throughout the day is helpful in maintaining blood glucose levels.

The plate method is a helpful tools for meal planning to visualize proper portion sizes of foods, and limit carbohydrate foods at each meal. For diabetics it is helpful to make ½ of the plate vegetables, ¼ of the plate protein, and ¼ of the plate grains/starch. This, combined with carbohydrate counting allows you to incorporate fruit and dairy into meals when you have carbohydrate servings available.

4. Hemoglobin A1c is a snap shot of your blood glucose at one moment in time?

b. No

Using a glucometer, or having your serum blood glucose drawn will provide a snap shot of you blood glucose at that moment in time. Hemoglobin A1c lets you know what your blood glucose was like over the last 3 months. For diabetics the goal is a Hemoglobin A1c below 7%. For non-diabetics the goal is a Hemoglobin A1c below 6%. If your Hemoglobin A1c is above the goal, this means that your blood glucose was on average not within goal range over the last 3 months.

5. Foods with sugar in them are not allowed in a diabetic diet.

b. False

People with diabetes can eat foods with sugar.  Sugar is not only contained in the obvious foods such as candy, soda, pastries, etc., but also in fruits and vegetables.

It is just important to be aware of the sugar content in foods and to eat foods with sugar in moderation. Using food labels to determine the carbohydrate content to foods is a good tool to use to help count the number of carbohydrate servings per meal. For example, if you eat a piece of cake, you should eat fewer starchy foods such as breads, potatoes, cereals etc. (i.e. carbohydrate foods, foods with sugar in them) to allow you to eat the cake, without shooting your blood sugar too high.

6. Eating vegetables and whole grains can help control blood sugar.

a. Yes

Vegetables and whole grains are foods that are high in dietary fiber. Dietary fiber helps to increase satiety without adding calories because fiber cannot be digested or absorbed. Fiber can decrease the risk of heart disease and help control blood sugar levels. Foods that are high in fiber are vegetables and nuts. Fruits, legumes, and whole-wheat flour and wheat bran, but should be counted during carbohydrate counting meal planning.

7. Doing physical activity and losing weight has no impact on diabetes.

b. No

Physical activity may improve insulin sensitivity and assist lowering elevated blood glucose levels. Physical activity is a big part of weight loss. Weight loss helps to lower insulin resistance, allowing insulin to do a better job of lowering blood glucose levels. Since losing weight helps to lower blood glucose, if you take diabetes medication, it may allow you to reduce the amount of medication being taken. Weight loss has other health benefits such as improving lipid levels, and blood pressure. People with diabetes are more at risk of getting heart disease, so lowering lipid levels and blood pressure helps to decrease this risk.

8. If I count my carbohydrates, then I can eat as many carbohydrate free foods as I want.

b. No

Carbohydrates aren’t the only dietary consideration. It is important to be aware of fat, cholesterol, and calorie intake. The best way to approach your diet is to choose nutritious, high fiber food, and control portion sizes. Using a combination of the plate method (½ plate vegetables, ¼ plate protein, ¼ plate grains/starch, then counting carbohydrates can add in fruit and dairy). Eating a healthy diet helps to control blood sugar and reduce the risk of diabetes-related conditions such as heart disease and stroke. Eating a consistent amount of carbohydrates at each meal helps to control blood glucose levels. It is important to avoid wide variations in carbohydrate consumption. Blood glucose levels that are outside the normal limits can cause long-term complications. Adopting a healthy lifestyle includes controlling portion sizes and total number of calories, eating a consistent amount of carbohydrates, eating a wide variety of foods, including vegetables and whole grains at each meal, reducing the amount of saturated fat, trans fat and cholesterol you eat, limiting sweets and salt, and engaging in physical activity daily.

This information was brought to you by OC Nutrition, Your Trusted Source for Health & Nutrition Advice, and Natalie Corso, Greater Los Angeles VA Dietetic Intern. OC Nutrition offers nutrition counseling services in Newport Beach, Irvine, Orange, Anaheim Hills, Chino Hills, and Long Beach.  If you have any questions or would like to schedule an appointment, please contact:

Kristy L. Richardson, MS,MPH, RD, CSSD, CHES
Registered Dietitian & Exercise Physiologist
(949) 933-6788
kristy@ocnutrition.com
www.ocnutrition.com




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