Ocnutrition’s Blog


Introducing the OC Nutrition Dietitians
January 26, 2010, 6:49 am
Filed under: Dietitians, Uncategorized

As many of you know, OC Nutrition used to be a “one woman show”. As a busy mom of a 7 month old girl (Rylee Jewel) I’m a little short on time. As a result, I have recruited 3 other top notch dietitians to help me provide nutrition services throughout Orange County. It gives me great pleasure to introduce you to the OC Nutrition Dietitians:

 

Robyn Moss, MS, RD
Robyn Moss, MS, RD has a Master of Science degree in Food Science and Nutrition and has been a Registered Dietitian for more than 25 years. As the executive dietitian to an international weight management company, Robyn was responsible for developing the food line, creating the menu plans and designing the educational materials. Once her 2 daughters became school-age she devoted her time to educating students and families on how to eat for success. Robyn has a passion for sports nutrition illustrated by her husband who went from “coach potato” to an Ironman. She also specializes in food allergies and intolerances.

Robyn provides nutrition counseling for OC Nutrition in Newport Beach, Irvine and Orange. To schedule an appointment with Robyn, please contact her at robyn@ocnutrition.com.

 

Joy Parsons, RD
Joy earned her bachelor’s degree in Nutrition & Dietetics from the University of Akron in Akron, Ohio. She is certified in Adult Weight Management through the ADA and is training for her Health and Fitness Instructor certification through ACSM. 

Joy has 8 years of experience in clinical nutrition. She currently works at Parkview Community Hospital in Riverside where she is the Clinical Nutrition Manager and oversees the outpatient weight loss program. Joy started her private practice, enJoy Health!, in 2007 to provide nutrition counseling and education to the Riverside/Temecula community. She recently expanded her practice to Anaheim and Azusa where she teaches nutrition classes for a weight loss program and provides nutrition counseling for seniors.

Joy enjoys educating individuals about nutrition and assisting each individual with their health and weight goals. She resides in Chino Hills with her husband, Mike and son, Liam.

Joy provides nutrition counseling for OC Nutrition in Chino and Anaheim Hills. To schedule an appointment with Joy, please contact her at joy@ocnutrition.com.

 

Dariella Gaete, MS, RD
Dariella received her B.S. in Dietetics and M.S. in Nutritional Science from California State University, Long Beach. She is currently a part-time instructor at CSULB and works for UCI Medical Center’s Bariatric program. She is certified in Adult Weight Management and trained in Intuitive Eating and has designed and implemented an Intuitive Eating based weight management class for UCI. She is also a Nutrition Specialist for The Network for a Healthy California where she provides nutrition education to elementary schools.

She is the Treasurer for the Orange District of the California Dietetic Association and was awarded Young Dietitian of the Year for 2010.

Dariella provides nutrition counseling for OC Nutrition in Long Beach. To schedule an appointment with Dariella, please contact her at dariella@ocnutrition.com

 

With OC Nutrition now having dietitians throughout all of Orange County, we’re hoping to make your life a little easier and provide our services at the location most convenient for you!

Sincerely,

Kristy

Kristy L. Richardson, MS, MPH, RD, CSSD, CHES
Registered Dietitian & Exercise Physiologist
(949) 933-6788
kristy@ocnutrition.com
www.ocnutrition.com



Healthy Dining Website
January 19, 2010, 6:59 pm
Filed under: Weight Management

There are numerous websites providing you with nutrition information for restaurants but very few provide you with information on what to choose if you’re trying to eat healthy. On the Healthy Dining Finder website you can search by your zip code or the name of the restaurant to find healthy dining options. Whether you’re going out for fast food or formal dining, check the Healthy Dining Finder website before you leave. The website is www.healthydiningfinder.com. Happy Dining!

This information was brought to you by OC Nutrition, Your Trusted Source for Health & Nutrition Advice. OC Nutrition offers nutrition counseling services over the phone or in person in Irvine, Orange, Anaheim Hills, Chino, Glendora and Long Beach. If you have any questions or would like to schedule an appointment, please contact:

Kristy L. Richardson, MS, MPH, RD, CSSD, CHES
Registered Dietitian & Exercise Physiologist
(949) 933-6788
kristy@ocnutrition.com
www.ocnutrition.com



“Made with Whole Grain”
January 12, 2010, 3:08 pm
Filed under: General Nutrition, Label Reading

Have you seen the statement “made with whole grain” on the front of your cereal or crackers box and wondered whether or not you’re truly buying a whole grain product. Many companies are very tricky when it comes to advertising and they can make it seem like their product is a healthy whole grain when in reality it is a refined grain in disguise. 

The best way to tell if you’re receiving a whole grain product is by looking at the first ingredient on the ingredient label. Companies are required to list the ingredients in order by weight so the first ingredient is always the main ingredient in the product. If the first ingredient is “enriched flour” you are mostly receiving refined grain with a lot of the fiber, vitamins and minerals removed. If instead the first ingredient includes the word “whole” you are mostly receiving a whole grain product with higher nutritional value. Keep in mind that if a product says “made with whole grain” this does not mean that it is 100% whole grain. This just means that there is a little bit of whole grain in the product. Typically when a product says “made with whole grain” the first ingredient is enriched flour and the third or fourth ingredient is whole wheat flour. 

Another quick easy way to figure out whether or not you’re receiving a whole grain product is by looking at the fiber content. As a general rule, whole grain products contain at least 3 grams of fiber per serving.   

The techniques for identifying a whole grain can be applied to all grain products, including bread, cereal, crackers, tortillas, bagels, etc.  Have fun practicing these techniques the next time you go to the grocery store!

Examples of Whole Grain Products
Oatmeal
Cheerios
Shredded Wheat
Wheaties
Kashi Cereal
Triscuits
Ak-Mak’s 100% Whole Wheat Crackers
Oroweat 100% Whole Wheat Bread
Sara Lee 100% Whole Wheat Bread
Mission Whole Wheat Tortillas
La Tortilla Whole Wheat Tortillas
Oroweat 100% Whole Wheat English Muffins
Thomas’ Hearty Grains 100% Whole Wheat English Muffins
Oroweat 100% Whole Wheat Mini Bagels
Thomas’ 100% Whole Wheat Mini Bagels
Ronzoni Healthy Harvest Whole Wheat Pasta
Minute Brown Rice
Uncle Ben’s Whole Grain Brown Ready Rice

This information was brought to you by OC Nutrition, Your Trusted Source for Health & Nutrition Advice.  OC Nutrition offers nutrition counseling services over the phone or in person in Irvine, Orange, Anaheim Hills, Chino, Glendora and Long Beach.  If you have any questions or would like to schedule an appointment, please contact:

Kristy L. Richardson, MS, MPH, RD, CSSD, CHES
Registered Dietitian & Exercise Physiologist
(949) 933-6788
kristy@ocnutrition.com
www.ocnutrition.com



Eating Healthy on a Budget
January 4, 2010, 11:07 pm
Filed under: General Nutrition

Do you have a hard time eating healthy because you’re on a tight budget?  Use the following tips to eat healthy and save money:

  • Eat at home more often
    • Make healthy snacks at home and take them with you
    • Pack a lunch most days of the week
    • Make healthy meals in large portions and freeze leftovers
  • Shopping techniques
    • Make a shopping list for this week’s meals and stick to the list
    • Don’t go shopping when you’re hungry!
    • Shop for most of your food around the perimeter of the store to avoid the more costly, processed foods
  • Look for deals
    • Browse your local stores to see who offers the best deals on your favorite, healthy products
    • Search the newspaper for coupons
    • Compare the per unit price between brands and different sized packages
    • Choose generic if possible
  • Buy in bulk
    • Look for deals on pre-bagged, bulk fruits and veggies
    • Purchase sale priced lean meats in bulk and freeze what you don’t plan to use in 5 days
    • Stock up on sale priced whole grain crackers and cereals
    • Most stores offer a discount on milk if you buy 2 gallons at a time
  • Go Frozen!
    • Stock up on sale priced frozen meals (Kashi, Lean Cuisine, Healthy Choice, Smart Ones)
    • Buy a wide variety of frozen veggies.  They are just as healthy as fresh veggies but they’re cheaper and last longer
    • Purchase frozen lean meats
  • Do your own prep work
    • Buy whole fruits and veggies and do the cutting and peeling yourself
    • Shred a block of reduced fat cheese
    • Remove skin from chicken breasts

This information was brought to you by OC Nutrition, Your Trusted Source for Health & Nutrition Advice.  OC Nutrition offers nutrition counseling services over the phone or in person in Irvine, Orange, Anaheim Hills, Chino, Glendora and Long Beach.  If you have any questions or would like to schedule an appointment, please contact:

Kristy L. Richardson, MS, MPH, RD, CSSD, CHES
Registered Dietitian & Exercise Physiologist
(949) 933-6788
kristy@ocnutrition.com
www.ocnutrition.com



Chicken Parmesan Italiano*
January 4, 2010, 11:07 pm
Filed under: Recipes

2 Tablespoons Italian-style bread crumbs
2 Tablespoons shredded fresh Parmesan cheese
2 Tablespoons reduced-fat feta
1 Tablespoon dried basil leaves
1 Tablespoon fresh lemon juice
3 Tablespoons olive oil
2 boneless, skinless chicken breasts

Nonstick cooking spray

1.  Heat oven to 425 degrees.  Line cookie sheet with foil; spray foil with nonstick cooking spray.

2.  In shallow dish, combine bread crumbs, cheeses and basil; mix well.  In small cup or bowl, combine lemon juice and olive oil.

3.  Brush both sides of chicken with lemon juice mixture; coat with bread crumbs.  Place on foil-lined cookie sheet.  Lightly spray chicken with cooking spray.

4.  Bake at 425 for 15-20 minutes or until chicken is fork-tender and juices run clear.

Yield: 2 servings

Suggestions:  Make with whole wheat pasta and vegetables (Ideas: broccoli, asparagus, zucchini or yellow squash).  Serve fruit for an appetizer or dessert (Ideas: strawberries, blueberries, blackberries, or raspberries).

*adapted from Pillsbury: Fast and Healthy Cookbook



Dietitian or Nutritionist: Who is the Nutrition Expert?
January 4, 2010, 11:06 pm
Filed under: Dietitians, Uncategorized

Did you know that in California anyone can call themselves a “Nutritionist”?  Most states require licensing, but section 2068 of California’s Business and Profession code allows anyone to call themselves a Nutritionist regardless of education.  People have taken advantage of this loophole to market themselves as so-called nutrition experts.  Many of these unqualified nutritionists are salesmen with illegitimate credentials obtained through diploma mills (organizations granting degrees which are fraudulent or worthless due to lack of proper standards).  According to the National Council Against Health Fraud (NCAHF), these unqualified “nutritionists” charge counseling fees for questionable advice; utilize unproven “tests” to assess nutritional status; and often profit personally from the sale of supplements they prescribe.

A Registered Dietitian (RD) is a professional credential, just like a Registered Nurse (RN) or Medical Doctor (MD).  The title is legally protected and can only be used by those authorized by the Commission on Dietetic Registration of the American Dietetic Association.  Individuals who are Registered Dietitians have 1) received a bachelor’s degree in dietetics from an accredited college or university; 2) completed at least 900 hours of internship experience at an accredited institution; 3) successfully completed the Registration Exam for Dietitians; and 4) maintained recertification by obtaining at least 75 hours of continuing education every 5 years.

While many illegitimate nutritionists provide advice that is not backed by sufficient research, Registered Dietitians are trained to critically evaluate research studies and base their advice on the most up-to-date research.  By looking at your medical history, medications, supplements, and eating and exercise habits, a Registered Dietitian can provide you with safe and effective nutrition counseling to help you reach your health and fitness goals.

To help protect you against unqualified nutritionists, the NCAHF recommends that you check out the accreditation status of any unfamiliar degree-granting institution and verify a nutritionist’s credentials by checking with the local, state or national dietetic association.

This information was brought to you by OC Nutrition, Your Trusted Source for Health & Nutrition Advice.  OC Nutrition offers nutrition counseling services over the phone or in person in Irvine, Orange, Anaheim Hills, Chino, Glendora and Long Beach.  If you have any questions or would like to schedule an appointment, please contact:

Kristy L. Richardson, MS, MPH, RD, CSSD, CHES
Registered Dietitian & Exercise Physiologist
(949) 933-6788
kristy@ocnutrition.com
www.ocnutrition.com

Useful Resources:

American Dietetic Association (ADA)
www.eatright.org

Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR)
www.cdrnet.org

National Council Against Health Fraud (NCAHF)
www.ncahf.org