Ocnutrition’s Blog


Southwestern Layered Bean Dip*
September 28, 2010, 10:35 pm
Filed under: Recipes

A Tex-Mex dip full of fiber and healthy fats

Ingredients:
16-ounce can nonfat refried beans
15-ounce can black beans, rinsed
4 scallions, sliced
1/2 cup salsa
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon chili powder
1/4 cup pickled jalapeño slices, chopped
1 cup reduced-fat shredded Monterey Jack, Cheddar or Mexican Blend
1/2 cup reduced-fat sour cream
1 1/2 cups chopped romaine lettuce
1 medium tomato, chopped
1 medium avocado, chopped
1/4 cup canned sliced black olives

Preparation 20 minutes:
1. Combine refried beans, black beans, scallions, salsa, cumin, chili powder and jalapeños in a medium bowl. Transfer to a shallow 2-quart microwave-safe dish; sprinkle with cheese.
2. Microwave on high until the cheese is melted and the beans are hot, 3 to 5 minutes.
3. Spread sour cream evenly over the hot bean mixture, then scatter with lettuce, tomato, avocado and olives.
Makes 12 servings: ½ cup per serving

*This recipe was adapted from the EatingWell website www.eatingwell.com



Save Money – Take a Closer Look at your Dietary Supplements
September 22, 2010, 12:14 am
Filed under: Dietary Supplements

Americans spend billions of dollars each year on dietary supplements.  Is all of this money worth it or should we be spending our hard earned money on other things?  Dietary supplements are regulated under the 1994 Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA). This law established the definition and labeling guidelines for supplements but did not ensure the safety, effectiveness or quality of these products.  As a result, we need to critically evaluate supplements before deciding whether they could help or potentially harm our health. 

Don’t just listen to what it says on the company website or what the sales person tells you at the supplement shop.  These companies want to make money so they tell you what they think you want to hear, even if it is false or misleading.  In general, stay away from “.com” websites and instead look for information that comes from the government (.gov), universities (.edu), and professional or non-profit organizations (.org). 

A Registered Dietitian can be a helpful resource when taking on the often overwhelming task of evaluating dietary supplements.  If you have questions about the supplements you’re taking or are considering taking, we’d be happy to answer them.  We’ve saved our patients thousands of dollars by helping them pare down their supplements to the ones that are safe and proven to be effective.  To schedule an appointment with one of our Registered Dietitians, please call 949-933-6788. 

This information was brought to you by OC Nutrition, Your Trusted Source for Health & Nutrition Advice.  OC Nutrition offers nutrition counseling services over the phone or in person in Newport Beach, Irvine, Orange, Anaheim Hills, Chino, Glendora and Long Beach.  If you have any questions or would like to schedule an appointment, please contact:

Kristy L. Richardson, MS, MPH, RD, CSSD, CHES
Registered Dietitian & Exercise Physiologist
(949) 933-6788
kristy@ocnutrition.com
www.ocnutrition.com
 



Slow vs. Fast Food
September 18, 2010, 12:26 am
Filed under: General Nutrition

We all know that fast food is not the most nutritious option. So, what is the opposite of fast food? That’s right you guessed it…slow food.  Slow food is the lesser heard of, healthy alternative to fast food.

The Slow Food Movement began in 1989 as a counter effort against the fast food mentality and lifestyle of our nation. Slow food can take on a variety of characteristics including being whole, organic, minimally processed, and locally grown.  Local food production and consumption is advocated to minimize the carbon foot print (the total amount of greenhouse gas emissions caused by the production of a food). 

One of the ways you can take part in the slow food movement is by purchasing food from local farmers markets. You’ll enjoy fresh food straight from the farm while positively impacting your health and environment. To find a list of local farmers markets, visit www.cafarmersmarkets.com and click on “Find a Market”.

To learn more about the Slow Food Movement and how you can consume more slow food products, visit: www.slowfoodusa.org

This information was brought to you by OC Nutrition, Your Trusted Source for Health & Nutrition Advice, and Estrella Atkinson, CSULB Nutrition Student.  OC Nutrition offers nutrition counseling services in Newport Beach, Irvine, Orange, Anaheim Hills, Chino, Glendora and Long Beach.  If you have any questions or would like to schedule an appointment, please contact:

Kristy L. Richardson, MS, MPH, RD, CSSD, CHES
Registered Dietitian & Exercise Physiologist
(949) 933-6788
kristy@ocnutrition.com
www.ocnutrition.com



What is Proprioception?
September 4, 2010, 4:15 pm
Filed under: Exercise

Proprioception is the body’s ability to convey a sense of position, analyze this information, and determine what reaction is appropriate.  In other words, it is the brain’s ability to know where a body part is without having to look.  This is necessary for performing coordinated movement and maintaining proper posture.  Proprioception allows us to do things such as walk, dress, and type without having to use our eyes for each movement. 

Proprioceptors are specialized sensory receptors located inside muscles, joints, and tendons.  These inform us of the degree to which muscles are contracted, the amount of tension created in the tendons, the change in position of a joint, and the orientation of the head.  It also makes us aware of the weight of objects and determines the amount of muscular force needed to move or lift an object. 

One of the most important tasks of proprioception is in core (trunk) stabilization.  Regular conditioning of the core muscles (abdominals and lower back) is vital for preventing injuries, ensuring correct posture, and create more efficient and functional movements.  The core is the power center of our bodies, so the core muscles can be the weakest link. 

Several studies have shown a close relationship between back pain and various aspects of proprioception.  Research suggests that those with lower back pain tend to have deterioration in certain aspects of proprioception that may persist without proper stability training.

How do we perform this proprioceptive type of training?  If we do exercises on unstable surfaces we will recruit the proprioceptors.  Unstable surfaces can be created in many different ways.  Exercises can be performed on one foot instead of two.  Stable surfaces can be avoided (for example, avoid using the back of a chair while seated).  There are also tools you can use such as stability or Swiss Balls, Dyna discs, balance pads, balance boards, foam rollers, medicine balls, and BOSU.   

We encourage you to start thinking more in terms of core stabilization and using unstable surfaces when you exercise and perform daily activities.  You’ll thank us for the improvements in posture, functional movements, and overall strength.

This information was brought to you by Just for the Health of It, a state-of-the-art personal training and yoga studio in the heart of Orange.  For more information please contact:

Diane McConahay, B.S.
Certified Personal Trainer and Yoga Instructor
(714) 639-0494
just4thehealthofit@sbcglobal.net
www.justforthehealthofit.info