Ocnutrition’s Blog


Coconut Water – Is It Nature’s Sports Drink?
November 10, 2010, 2:59 am
Filed under: General Nutrition, Sports Nutrition

Coconut water appears to be gaining popularity as an alternative to sports drinks.  But is this drink a good alternative? 

Coconut water is advertised as a great source of electrolytes, especially potassium.  In fact it typically provides 15 times the amount of potassium in a standard sports drink.  Though this sounds like an improvement, it may not be what an athlete needs for replenishment.  We do lose potassium and other electrolytes when we sweat, but our water and sodium losses are most significant.  

Coconut water is new to the market so there is limited research on its effectiveness as a sports drink.  Research on other drinks reveals that the optimal composition of an 8 ounce cup of sports drink is 10-18 grams of carbohydrate and at least 100 milligrams of sodium.  Popular brands like Gatorade meet these recommendations.  Coconut water, on the other hand, does not meet these recommendations.  An 8 ounce cup typically contains 9 grams of carbohydrate and about 30 milligrams of sodium.

Though the nutrient composition of coconut water appears similar to that of a sports drink, there are still shortcomings.  These deficiencies and their effects need to be researched before we can say whether or not coconut water is truly nature’s sports drink.  

This information was brought to you by OC Nutrition, Your Trusted Source for Health & Nutrition Advice, and Lauren Bernardo, CSULB Dietetic Intern.  OC Nutrition offers nutrition counseling services in Newport Beach, Irvine, Orange, Anaheim Hills, Chino, Glendora and Long Beach.  If you have any questions or would like to schedule an appointment, please contact:

Kristy L. Richardson, MS, MPH, RD, CSSD, CHES
Registered Dietitian & Exercise Physiologist
(949) 933-6788
kristy@ocnutrition.com
www.ocnutrition.com



Pre-Workout Nutrition
August 20, 2010, 12:36 am
Filed under: Exercise, Sports Nutrition

Do you avoid food prior to your workouts because of abdominal discomfort or digestive issues?  To avoid these problems, make sure your pre-training nutrition is low in fat and fiber and focuses on high carbohydrate foods. 

  • Ready-to-eat cereal, low fat milk and a banana
  • Yogurt and fruit
  • Egg whites, toast and berries
  • English muffin, peanut butter and a banana
  • Bagel, light cream cheese and a piece of fruit

If you are not used to eating before a workout, start with something small that is high in carbohydrates and well tolerated.

  • Half of a banana
  • 1 cup of low fat yogurt
  • ½ cup of cooked cereal (e.g. cream of wheat or oatmeal)
  • 1 cup of ready-to-eat cereal

As you develop a tolerance for pre-workout nutrition, you should be able to gradually increase the amount.  If you’re still having digestive trouble, try a liquid meal.

  • Gatorade Nutrition Shake
  • Ensure
  • Boost
  • Slim-Fast
  • Carnation Instant Breakfast   

It might take a few tries before you find the pre-workout nutrition that’s right for you.  Find comfort in the fact that the effort you put in will pay off in the long run.  Proper nutrition before your workout will help you optimize glycogen stores, improve energy levels, avoid hunger, and may even assist in muscle building.

This information was brought to you by OC Nutrition, Your Trusted Source for Health & Nutrition Advice.  OC Nutrition offers nutrition counseling services over the phone or in person in Newport Beach, Irvine, Orange, Anaheim Hills, Chino, Glendora and Long Beach.  If you have any questions or would like to schedule an appointment, please contact:

Kristy L. Richardson, MS, MPH, RD, CSSD, CHES
Registered Dietitian & Exercise Physiologist
(949) 933-6788
kristy@ocnutrition.com
www.ocnutrition.com



Using Nutrition To Optimize Recovery
February 23, 2010, 8:52 pm
Filed under: Sports Nutrition

Did you know that adjusting the timing and nutrient composition of your after workout meals can increase your energy, enhance your ability to gain muscle mass and improve your performance in subsequent workouts?

The 2 hour Window

Your body has an enhanced ability to replenish muscle glycogen stores (one of your main fuel sources during workouts) and repair muscle tissue during the 2 hours following a workout.  In order to optimize recovery, make sure to consume a recovery snack within 30 minutes of your workout and a real meal within 2 hours.  The recovery snack and real meal should include carbohydrate and protein.

When choosing drinks, bars or other recovery foods, look for a 3:1 or 4:1 ratio of carbohydrate to protein.  Here are a few recovery recommendations for drinks, bars and other foods. 

Recovery Drinks

  • Low fat milk, chocolate milk or soy milk
  • Recovery shake made with milk/yogurt, fruit & 1 scoop of whey protein
  • Light Muscle Milk with a banana
  • P90X Recovery Drink
  • Endurox R4

Recovery Bars

  • Kashi Go Lean
  • Luna
  • Powerbar Harvest
  • Clif
  • Balance or Zone Bar with fruit

Other Convenient Recovery Foods

  • Low fat yogurt or cottage cheese & fruit
  • Sandwich containing lean meats or peanut butter
  • Lean Ole’ frozen burrito from Costco
  • BRC burrito from El Pollo Loco

Recovery nutrition is most important following:

  • Intense aerobic workouts longer than 90 minutes with less than 24 hours of recovery
  • Intense resistance training

This information was brought to you by OC Nutrition, Your Trusted Source for Health & Nutrition Advice.  OC Nutrition offers nutrition counseling services over the phone or in person in Irvine, Orange, Anaheim Hills, Chino, Glendora and Long Beach.  If you have any questions or would like to schedule an appointment, please contact:

Kristy L. Richardson, MS, MPH, RD, CSSD, CHES
Registered Dietitian & Exercise Physiologist
(949) 933-6788
kristy@ocnutrition.com
www.ocnutrition.com



Sports Nutrition Class
February 2, 2010, 7:26 pm
Filed under: Sports Nutrition

Did you know that by adjusting what you eat and when you eat after a workout, you can increase your energy, enhance your ability to gain muscle mass and improve your performance in subsequent workouts?

Your body has an enhanced ability to replenish muscle glycogen stores (one of your main fuel sources during workouts) and repair muscle tissue during the 2 hours following a workout. In order to optimize recovery, make sure to consume a recovery snack within 30 minutes of your workout and a real meal within 2 hours.

The recovery snack and real meal should include carbohydrate and protein. When choosing drinks, bars or other recovery foods, look for a 3:1 or 4:1 ratio of carbohydrate to protein. Chocolate milk is an example of a recovery drink with a 4:1 ratio of carbohydrate to protein.

For more information on recovery nutrition and the fundamentals of nutrition for performance, OC Nutrition will be offering a Sports Nutrition Class in Newport Beach. This course provides CEU’s by the National Athletic Trainers Association (NATA).

SPORTS NUTRITION CLASS
WHEN: Saturday, February 6, 2010
TIME: 9:00am-12:00pm
WHERE: OC Fitness Solutions studio, Newport Beach.
Sign up today! Contact Kristy at kristy@ocnutrition.com or (949) 933-6788.

This information was brought to you by OC Nutrition, Your Trusted Source for Health & Nutrition Advice. OC Nutrition offers nutrition counseling services over the phone or in person in Irvine, Orange, Anaheim Hills, Chino, Glendora and Long Beach. If you have any questions or would like to schedule an appointment, please contact:

Kristy L. Richardson, MS, MPH, RD, CSSD, CHES
Registered Dietitian & Exercise Physiologist
(949) 933-6788
kristy@ocnutrition.com
www.ocnutrition.com