Ocnutrition’s Blog


Get Your Plate In Shape; Fill Half-Your-Plate With Fruits & Veggies
April 13, 2012, 10:49 pm
Filed under: Diabetes, General Nutrition, Heart Health, Weight Management

Did you know the average American eats only 43% of the recommended amount of fruit and 57% of the recommended amount of vegetables each day?  Include more colorful fruits and vegetables in your menu plan for a brighter future.  Fruits and vegetables reduce your risk of heart disease, cancer, and other chronic conditions.

When choosing fruits and vegetables, “eat the rainbow of colors.”  Different color groups provide a unique set of vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients.  Fruits and veggies are nutritious in any form:  fresh, frozen, canned or dried.  They are available year round and are ready when you are.

Benefits of eating more Fruits and Vegetables:

  • Fiber help fill you up, lowers cholesterol, and aids your digestive system
  • Disease Reduction including heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, some cancers and Type 2 Diabetes
  • Vitamins & Minerals  are abundant which keeps you stay healthy and energized
  • Low in Calories and rich in flavor and texture

How to include more Fruits & Vegetables

  • Include veggies with breakfast:  add mushrooms and peppers to eggs to make an omelet, or wrap up an egg and veggie scramble in a whole wheat tortilla
  • Enjoy fruit and veggies as your snack:  top of Greek yogurt with frozen fruit, dip carrots or sliced bell peppers in hummus, or make up a trail mix of dried fruit and nuts
  • Add extra veggies to your favorite dishes: pile veggies on top of your pizza, stuff them in your sandwich, or add veggies to pasta sauces, soups, and casseroles
  • Include a colorful salad with your lunch or dinner and add some fresh or dried fruit for a little sweetness
  • Choose fruits and veggies that are darker or brighter in color; these contain more vitamins and minerals
  • Each week choose a new fruit and/or veggie.  There are hundreds to choose from and it adds variety to your meal
  • Purchase fruits and veggies from local farmers or markets to ensure the freshness and hence its nutrient content

This information was brought to you by Robyn Moss, MS, RD and OC Nutrition, Your Trusted Source for Health & Nutrition Advice.  OC Nutrition offers nutrition counseling services over the phone or in person in Newport Beach, Irvine, Orange, Anaheim Hills, Chino Hills and Long Beach.  If you have any questions or would like to schedule an appointment, please contact:

Kristy L. Richardson, MS,MPH, RD, CSSD, CHES
Registered Dietitian & Exercise Physiologist
kristy@ocnutrition.com
http://www.ocnutrition.com
(949) 933-6788



FREE Mindful Eating Seminar with Robyn Moss, MS, RD from OC Nutrition
April 13, 2012, 10:30 pm
Filed under: Dietitians, Eating out, General Nutrition, Weight Management

Brain ImageTuesday, May 1, 2012
6:30-7:30 pm

Just For The Health Of It and OC Nutrition are bringing you a nutrition seminar to make you think.  There are countless acts of mindless eating that we all do throughout the day ~ eating on the go, driving through for coffee in the morning, afternoon fatigue leading to poor snack choices,  eating in front of the TV, etc. These speedy habits may contribute to a range of eating and digestive issues.  Learn how to enhance your ability to eat with greater awareness assisting in better food choices and how to stop eating when you are full.

Sign-ups are required.
Call or email to register today…

JUST FOR THE HEALTH OF IT!
417 N. Tustin St., Orange   ~  714.639.0494
email: diane@justforthehealthofit.info
 
This information was brought to you by Just for the Health of It and OC Nutrition, Your Trusted Source for Health & Nutrition Advice. OC Nutrition offers nutrition counseling services over the phone or in person in Newport Beach, Irvine, Orange, Anaheim Hills, Chino Hills and Long Beach. If you have any questions or would like to schedule an appointment, please contact:

Kristy L. Richardson, MS, MPH, RD, CSSD, CHES
Registered Dietitian & Exercise Physiologist
kristy@ocnutrition.com
http://www.ocnutrition.com
(949) 933-6788



“Healthy Fat’’—a Contradiction or Not?
February 19, 2012, 9:13 pm
Filed under: General Nutrition, Heart Health, Label Reading, Weight Management

Fat has gotten somewhat of a bad rap in the past and you increasingly see more and more “low fat,” “reduced fat,” and “non-fat” food items popping up in supermarkets. However a balanced diet should have 20-35% of your daily calories coming from fat. What’s important is to pay attention to the kinds of fat you’re eating, decrease unhealthy fats (saturated and trans fats), and focus on healthy fats (monounsaturated and omega-3).

Saturated fat and trans fats are considered unhealthy because they promote unhealthy cholesterol levels, plaque formation, and inflammation in the body. Saturated fats shouldn’t make up more than 10% of your calories and they are found in foods like butter, cheese, beef, whole fat dairy, and other animal products. Trans fats shouldn’t make up more than 2% of your calories and they are found in fast food, fried food, and other processed food with hydrogenated oils.

The healthy fats which have been found to have the most health benefits are monounsaturated fats and omega-3s. Monounsaturated fats can improve your cholesterol and decrease risk of heart disease and stroke. These fats are also needed to keep your body’s cells healthy. Monounsaturated fats can be found in nuts, canola oil, olive oil, sunflower oil, peanut oil, and avocado. Omega-3 fats can improve heart health by preventing plaque buildup, lowering blood pressure, and preventing irregular heartbeats. The USDA recommends daily intake of 1.6 g (1,600 mg) for men and 1.1 g (1,100 mg) for women. Omega-3 fats are found in fatty fish (salmon, trout, tuna, etc.), canola oil, walnuts, flaxseed, and leafy green vegetables.

A few ways you can include more of these healthy fats in your diet are to:

  • use healthy fats instead of unhealthy fats when cooking (ex. canola instead of butter)
  • have a handful of nuts or trail mix for a snack
  • make an effort to have fatty fish at least twice a week
  • dip bread in olive oil rather than spreading on butter

Remember, not all fats are created equal and monounsaturated and omega-3 fats are necessary for optimum health. Maintaining a well-balanced diet with an emphasis on these healthy fats will improve your body’s function now and help prevent diseases in the future, a win-win!

This information was brought to you by OC Nutrition, Your Trusted Source for Health & Nutrition Advice, and Jenna Haug, CSULB Dietetic Intern. OC Nutrition offers nutrition counseling services over the phone or in person in Newport Beach, Irvine, Orange, Anaheim Hills, Chino Hills and Long Beach. If you have any questions or would like to schedule an appointment, please contact:

Kristy L. Richardson, MS, MPH, RD, CSSD, CHES
Registered Dietitian & Exercise Physiologist
kristy@ocnutrition.com
http://www.ocnutrition.com
(949) 933-6788



January: A great time to start a Healthy New Year
December 31, 2011, 2:19 am
Filed under: Eating out, General Nutrition, Heart Health, Weight Management

January 1:  Have a family discussion about New Year’s resolutions today.

January 2:  Choose one new fruit or vegetable to try this week.

January 3:  Buy yourself a good cookbook full of healthful recipes or find an “app”. The American Heart Association has several.

January 4:  Keep an eye out for “New Year” deals on gym memberships, fitness equipment, or workout videos.

January 5:  Tally how many calories your family is consuming each day in beverages (include juices as well as soda). Is it worth it?

January 6:  Have a special healthy treat tonight!  Get creative using your new cookbook/app for a yummy and healthful dessert.

January 7:  Have everyone rank their hunger on a scale of 1–10 before eating today. Choose servings accordingly.

January 8:  Plan a week’s worth of healthy meals today.

January 9:  Learn more about Meatless Mondays by visiting www.meatlessmonday.com.

January 10:  Replace one half of the fat in baked good recipes with unsweetened applesauce or mashed banana.

January 11:  Look for frozen meals, if your family eats them, which contain ≤600 milligrams of sodium/serving.

January 12:  Know that most cereal bars are not a good choice for breakfast. Many contain too much sugar and not enough protein or fiber.

January 13:  Have everyone wait 20 minutes before getting a second helping today.

January 14:  Make a meal involving beans today, such as black bean burritos, chili, bean soup, or your family’s favorite.

January 15:  Brainstorm new ideas for packed lunches today.

January 16:  Remove foods that contain “partially hydrogenated fats” from your cupboards.

January 17:  Make a dental appointment, if you need one. Everyone in the house needs to see a dentist every 6 months.

January 18:  Clean kitchen sponges by wetting them and zapping them in the microwave for 2 minutes.

January 19:  Have everyone pitch in and clean the house. It is great exercise!

January 20:  Choose another new fruit or vegetable to try this week!

January 21:  Popcorn is a whole grain and high in fiber. Use a lite margarine or a bit of olive oil to flavor it.

January 22:  Purchase a pedometer for each family member or buy one and switch users each day. The goal is to accumulate 10,000 steps/day!

January 23:  Choose bread that has at least three grams of fiber in each slice.

January 24:  Track how much “screen time” the kids or even you use each day, set a limit of 2 hours!

January 25:  Try a new grain, such as bulgur, barley, or quinoa.

January 26:  Make a pizza with thin crust (whole grain if possible), and top with all the vegetables you can!  Cook the veggies first to prevent the crust from soaking up the liquid.

January 27:  Blend cooked cauliflower into your mashed potatoes. You will not even taste it!

January 28:  Measure some foods today to see what a “serving size” actually looks like.

January 29:  Find a recipe for a baked fruit that you have never tried before.

January 30:  Add a spoonful of wheat germ to your yogurt or cereal. It is rich in vitamins. Wheat germ also adds a bit of fiber and a nice crunch to food!

January 31:  Include a fruit and/or vegetable with each meal today and every day.  Fruits and vegetables provide fiber and a multitude of vitamins and minerals.

This information was brought to you by Robyn Moss, MS, RD and OC Nutrition, Your Trusted Source for Health & Nutrition Advice.  OC Nutrition offers nutrition counseling services over the phone or in person in Newport Beach, Irvine, Orange, Anaheim Hills, Chino Hills and Long Beach.  If you have any questions or would like to schedule an appointment, please contact:

 
Kristy L. Richardson, MS, MPH, RD, CSSD, CHES
Registered Dietitian & Exercise Physiologist
kristy@ocnutrition.com
http://www.ocnutrition.com
(949) 933-6788
 



Power-up Breakfast
October 24, 2011, 4:17 am
Filed under: General Nutrition, Weight Management

Are you busy like most people? Life is constantly adding new things to your plate and you don’t have enough energy to do it all. Let’s reacquaint you with the mighty breakfast. There are many reasons why you should not only eat but also enjoy your breakfast and here are a few:

1. Eating a balanced breakfast gives you energy to start your day and remain energized throughout.
2. Breakfast wakes up your metabolism and can help with weight maintenance or weight loss.
3. Studies show that if you eat breakfast you’re less likely to overeat at other meals.
4. If you include protein and carbohydrates in the morning then you’re providing fuel for your brain and steady fuel for the morning to reduce hunger for 3-5 hours.

Here are some quick and easy breakfast ideas. New recipes can help make you excited and motivated to include this ever-important meal in your morning routine.

• Oatmeal with milk (instead of water), raisins, dried cranberries and walnuts (a good source of omega 3)
• Toaster waffle with yogurt and fresh fruit
• Whole-wheat pita with hard boiled egg and low-fat cheese
• Almond butter on whole grain bagel with apple slices
• Tortilla with peanut butter and banana
• Add berries, peaches or strawberries to your favorite cold cereal with low-fat or nonfat milk
• Smoothie with low-fat milk, frozen fruit (such as berries) and a banana

If your palate doesn’t prefer breakfast foods try:

• Deli turkey and a slice of cheese on whole wheat bread
• A slice of leftover veggie or lean meat pizza (chicken or Canadian bacon)

Don’t be afraid to try something new or shake-up your morning routine. If you treat yourself to breakfast then your body will thank you by carrying you through your busy day with energy!

Inspired by Eat Right: Food, Nutrition and Health Tips from the American Dietetic Association handout, Power-up with Breakfast.

This information was brought to you by OC Nutrition, Your Trusted Source for Health & Nutrition Advice, and Amanda Trimmell, Iowa State Dietetic Intern. OC Nutrition offers nutrition counseling services in Newport Beach, Irvine, Orange, Anaheim Hills, Chino Hills and Long Beach. If you have any questions or would like to schedule an appointment, please contact:

Kristy L. Richardson, MS, MPH, RD, CSSD, CHES
Registered Dietitian & Exercise Physiologist
(949) 933-6788
kristy@ocnutrition.com
http://www.ocnutrition.com



Should We Eat Like a Caveman?
June 30, 2011, 3:06 pm
Filed under: General Nutrition, Weight Management

Getting back to basics and eating only the foods that people could hunt or gather is what the Paleo Diet is based on.  This diet has become increasingly popular with its message that the standard Westernized diet we currently consume isn’t what our body has been genetically adapted to process.  Eating paleo is broadcasted as the most natural way for our body to eat but is this true and is the diet nutritionally sound?

Proponents of the diet believe that people during the Paleolithic time period ate the healthiest and didn’t suffer from today’s
problems like obesity or cardiovascular issues.  This ancestral diet boils down to eating unlimited fresh fruits and vegetables, lean meats, and seafood.  But it would require giving up all grain or dairy products because those foods weren’t around at that time.

At first eating exclusively paleo foods sounds great because of the high amounts of antioxidants, soluble fiber, and “good fats” but at what expense?

  • Not eating any grain products, especially whole grains, would mean missing out on a good source of necessary vitamins, minerals, and fiber.
  • Not eating grains generally leads to a diet that is too low in carbohydrates.  The main carbohydrate sources in the paleo diet are fruits and vegetables and to meet the minimum carbohydrate recommendation for a 2000 calorie diet you would have to eat about 18 cups of fruits and vegetables.  This isn’t realistic for most people.
  • Life without milk can mean low calcium intake.  Calcium plays a major role in our bone health and inadequate calcium can put you at higher risk for osteoporosis.
  • It can take a toll on your pocketbook.  Eating the large amounts of protein that the diet calls for can put a dent in your grocery bill.  Lean meats and seafood don’t come cheap.

A good diet is one that incorporates all the food groups.  By consuming a wide variety of foods, including dairy and grains, you are ensuring that you get all the nutrients your body needs.  If there is anything to learn from eating like a caveman it is that we should eat more fruits and veggies!

This information was brought to you by OC Nutrition, Your Trusted Source for Health & Nutrition Advice, and Amanda Sauceda, CSULB Dietetic Intern.  OC Nutrition offers nutrition counseling services over the phone or in person in Newport Beach, Irvine, Orange, Anaheim Hills, Chino Hills and Long Beach.  If you have any questions or would like to schedule an appointment, please contact:

Kristy L. Richardson, MS, MPH,
RD, CSSD, CHES
Registered Dietitian & Exercise Physiologist
kristy@ocnutrition.com
www.ocnutrition.com
(949) 933-6788



One Easy Move for a Healthy Heart
May 6, 2011, 5:42 pm
Filed under: Exercise, Heart Health, Weight Management

When I’m heavily involved in a task at the office that will take more than an hour, I force myself to get up off my chair and stand. My mantra has led me to take calls while standing and greet colleagues who “live” across the hall. That’s right – I’m proudly announcing that I have been doing lots of standing around at the office. Don’t get me wrong, I consider myself a workaholic and expect everyone to make the best use of work time. On the other hand, I want to be around for a long time to carry on with my workaholic tendencies.

This sudden obsession with standing was triggered after I came across a study conducted by Peter Katzmarzyk at Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Louisiana. Katzmarzyk and his team analyzed the lifestyles of 17,000 individuals over 13 years; the research highlighted that people who sit for most of the day are 54 percent more likely to die of a heart attack – men and women are equally at risk. This means that the chance of heart attack doubles if you sit all day even if you exercise and eat well. This is because sitting is an independent risk factor regardless of other healthy behaviors you may be involved in. Quite frankly, I had to stand and read the rest of the article.

If the statistics don’t fully convince you, how about standing to burn extra calories? That’s right; when you stand you can burn more calories and even improve posture, tone muscles and increase blood flow.

Here are some tips to help you get started:

1. Socialize, stretch or visit the water cooler: Take a quick break every hour by getting up and stretching. If you’re in a cubicle like me and don’t want to attract attention when your hands are waving in the air with a stretch, get up and go to the water cooler instead. You can also try getting up and saying hello to your office mates. Standing up does not have to take you away from what you are doing or make you unproductive. A quick stand break is the goal.

2. Ditch the chair while on the phone. Get your body accustomed to the idea of getting up by standing while talking on the phone. Another option is to stand while reviewing work.

3. Set the alarm or mark it on your calendar: A common office chant is, “Is it that time already –4PM?” If you are so busy that you lose track of time, consider scheduling reminders on your calendar or phone. The idea is to make standing part of your daily routine.

4. Get a standing work station: Equipment such as Ergotron allows people to change positions, improve posture and stand while being productive at the office. Your human resources  or safety department may give you a high five for introducing a new idea since this type of equipment is known to increase workers’ wellness.

The bottom line is that sitting for long periods can compromise your health. Don’t be shy about standing around at the office and making health a priority – if a workaholic like me can squeeze it in and make it a routine, anyone can do it.

This information was brought to you by guest blogger Claudia Montoya, B.S. Human Development and OC Nutrition, Your Trusted Source for Health & Nutrition Advice. OC Nutrition offers nutrition counseling services over the phone or in person in Newport Beach, Irvine, Orange, Anaheim Hills, Chino Hills and Long Beach. If you have any questions or would like to schedule an appointment, please contact:

Kristy L. Richardson, MS, MPH, RD, CSSD, CHES
Registered Dietitian & Exercise Physiologist
kristy@ocnutrition.com
www.ocnutrition.com
(949) 933-6788